Enter Did Juno Contest Before the end of May

Hurry to enter the Did Juno contest before the end of May. We’re giving away two Juno 100 feed pushers! Sign up to win online at www.lelylife.com/didjuno

Lely Juno provides 24/7 constant availability of fresh roughage with less labor
It is well known that continuous availability of fresh fodder results in increased dry matter intake and increased milk production. In addition, frequent feeding has a positive impact on general animal health. Quite often, labor is the limiting factor in making fresh feed available to cows around the clock. Thanks to the Lely Juno, this problem is a thing of the past.

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Study of over 500 robot herds finds free-flow traffic adds 2.5 pounds/cow

March192015Lucas Sjostrom with Dairy Herd Management recently attended the Lely Farm Management Support (FMS) Conference and wrote this article based on research presented by Ben Smink, Lely FMS Senior Consultant. Read an excerpt below or the entire article here.

A UW-Madison study of 635 Lely robot farms in North America analyzed over 71,000 observations to find optimal situations for robot herds amongst current owners. The data, paired with farm specifics like breed, geographic location, pen size, and whether or not they were in the Canadian quota system also grouped 529 farms into 11 “clusters” of similar output, allowing future robot owners to estimate what they might expect when building a certain type of robot facility.

Likely the most important result from the findings, presented at Lely’s 2015 Farm Management Support conference in Pella, Iowa, was the difference in the long-debated free-flow versus guided-flow traffic in an automatic milking facility. Based on the Lely-only data of 635 farms, the study found 2.4 pounds of milk per cow per day and 148 pounds of milk per robot per day more on farms with free-flow traffic. Lely considers farms to be free-flow only if cows can choose where to go at all times during normal operating procedures; a pre-selection gate would be considered guided-flow.

Other indicators of higher milk per cow/robot per day were a greater number of milkings, faster milking speed, more box time, as well as seasonal differences.

Predictors for lower milk per cow was Jersey (8.2 pounds per day less, not energy corrected), more failed milkings, more connection attempts, and seasonal differences.

The Lely data found no significant differences between cows milked in brand-new barns versus retrofit facilities over the 4 year study. New barns did demonstrate a great yield increase between years one and two, but after two years the differences diminished.

Read the entire article.

 

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Hoof trimming: Make the Most of Trimming Day

Dec22Agriculture.comimg_54908520c2320_46706Lucas Sjostrom with Dairy Herd Management recently attended the Lely Farm Management Support (FMS) Conference and wrote this article based on an informative session by speaker Gerard Cramer, DVM, DVSc, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota’s School of Veterinary Medicine who specializes in hoof health. Read an excerpt below or the entire article here.

 

Hoof trimming: Make the most of trimming day

By Lucas Sjostrom, Dairy Herd Management.

 

  1. Hoof trimming: An art lacking science?
  2. Hoof trimming: Make the most of hoof trimming day
  3. Hoof trimming: Prevent and treat lameness, with a purpose

 

Hoof trimming as a science has much to learn. But it will take a number of years and a lot of funding before the verdict drops on the best time, way, and frequency to trim for cow hoof health. In the meantime, your hoof trimmer is likely going to keep showing up. Make the most of hoof trimming day by following these tips from Gerard Cramer, DVM, DVSc, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota’s School of Veterinary Medicine specializing in hoof health.

 

  1. Collect hoof trimming data accurately

Most dairy producers and hoof trimmers are collecting some sort of data on hoof trimming day, but make sure it’s accurate. Not everything is an abscess.

“Most trimmers are recording something, but people in the industry aren’t necessarily using the data very effectively,” Cramer explained. “We’re probably making it too complicated. If we record only white line disease, sole ulcers, digital dermatitis, and maybe thin soles, everything else is important to the cow, but they don’t happen often enough to make decisions at the herd level.”

  1. Use the data collected effectively

Nearly every hoof trimmer collects some data, transferring it to the dairy farm’s management team in written or electronic form. What happens next is up to you.

Was it a bad month for feet and legs, or is there something you can correct to make the next trim better?

“It needs to be looked at and analyzed in some form, so it can be monitored like we monitor somatic cell count, disease prevalence, or D.A. incidence,” Cramer suggested. “We should be able to say, ‘My incidence of sole ulcers is 3%.’  We also need a goal for it, like most dairies have a realistic goal for somatic cell count. If I ask dairies today what their goal is for lameness, they struggle with it.

“In an ideal world, I want to be able to walk on a dairy and ask, ‘What’s your preg risk goal?’ Okay, ‘What’s your lameness goal?’ and they would quickly turnaround with percentage answers to both questions,” Cramer said. “Lameness is going to happen, but we should be working towards a goal.”

  1. Know the causes of the disease affecting your herd
  • Sole ulcers. “If I have a herd with a sole ulcer problem, I basically deal with standing time,” Cramer said. “This could include any part of the time budget that includes standing time, focusing on the transition period. It could be heat stress, parlor management, or stall sizing.”
  • White line disease.If white line is your top issue, flooring is most likely the problem, Cramer said. Watch for cows slipping or areas of uneven flooring. (See sidebar to learn more.)
  • Digital dermatitis.Hygiene and foot bathing are the areas to target.
  • Thin soles. Thin soles are caused by over-wearing, either by the grinder or by the floor.

Read the entire article here.

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April Winner – 2015 #LelyLife “More” Photo Contest

“Lely provides ‘more’ time to spend with our special cows.”
— Ashley Swenson, Forest-Lawn Holsteins, Inc., Nicollet, MN11090969_10206255051956713_6122313323672054181_o

Congratulations to Ashley Swenson of Nicollet, Minnesota who submitted this great photo. Ashley is the April winner of the #LelyLife photo contest. Show us your “More” in May. See the photo contest details below or at www.lelylife.com/2015-lelylife-more-photo-contest/

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Lameness Prevention Starts with Breeding Age Heifers

As we have mentioned this week, the Lely North America Farm Management Support (FMS) team met at the Lely North American headquarters in Pella, Iowa, along with dairy industry colleagues, to share valuable research and to find, produce and harvest the next gallon of profitable high quality milk with robots. Jim Dickrell, editor of Dairy Today, attended the meetings and posted this article from one of the sessions. Read an excerpt below or the entire article here.

Preventing lameness in dairy cows starts long before they enter the milking string. In fact, if you’re not assessing lameness and looking for digital dermatitis in your breeding age heifers, you’re risk of lameness rises exponentially.

“When digital dermatitis does not occur in heifers, the occurrence in the milking herd will be minimal with good management,” says Karl Burgi.

Burgi is a hoof-care guru of sorts, who heads up the Dairyland Hoof Care Initiative in Baraboo, Wis. and consults worldwide on proper hoof care and trimming techniques. He spoke this week at the Lely Robotic Milker Farm Management Support Conference in Pella, Iowa.  Read more here.

LelyAlberta1May2015

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Sara McBurney, Lely Senior FMS Consultant & Veterinarian

The Lely North America Farm Management Support (FMS) team includes trained Senior Robot Advisors and experts in areas of feed nutrition, veterinary medicine and more.

SaraMcBurneyFMSSara McBurney is a Senior Farm Management Support Consultant/Veterinarian for Lely. She provides support to dealers, consultants and farmers for Quebec and the Atlantic Provinces, as well as the eastern U.S. from Vermont to Virginia.

“As a team, we travel to different areas to provide training and certification sessions for external consultants and Lely Center employees for farm management support, as well as general support and visits for different local activities,” McBurney says.

McBurney loves getting to visit so many different types of farms, and being able to help farmers and consultants bring their operation to the next level.

“Whether a farm has just started or has been running for years, being able to help a producer reach their goals is exciting,” McBurney says. “I also love being able to use my veterinary training to help people adapt their management skills, which helps to keep their cows happy and healthy.”

Follow the Lely North America FMS group on Twitter at @LelyFMSNA.

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Follow @LelyFMSNA on Twitter

LelyFMSConferenceGroup

As we mentioned earlier this week, the Lely North America Farm Management Support (FMS) team has been meeting at the Lely North American headquarters in Pella, Iowa, along with dairy industry colleagues, to share valuable research and to find, produce and harvest the next gallon of profitable high quality milk with robots. Their goal has been to share the latest insights into the continuously developing world of automatic milking.

To continue the conversation beyond this week, Lely NA is launching a Twitter account where the FMS team and dairy industry can share and exchange the latest information on robotic dairy farm management and know how to use that knowledge in practice. ollow @LelyFMSNA on Twitter to see and hear the latest insights from our Lely FMS team in North America.  The hashtag #LelyKnowHow will be used as our company shares information with colleagues in order to better serve users of robotic milking systems.

 

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Lely North America Farm Management Support (FMS) Team

Summer 2014 - WDE VFT, Knigge, VTM 275The Lely North America Farm Management Support (FMS) team includes trained Senior Robot Advisors and experts in areas of feed nutrition, veterinary medicine and more.

In its aim for continuous improvements, Lely has established the FMS group to raise the quality of management advice given to its dairy farmer customers. The Lely NA FMS team covers territories across North America.

This week, at Lely North America headquarters in Pella, the Lely FMS team is coming together along with many of their industry colleagues to exchange ideas and share valuable research and information. Many Lely Center employees and others will be on hand to learn and share information with these experts.

The goal of the conference is to share the latest insights into the continuously developing world of automatic milking.

We are proud of our Lely FMS team and will continue to introduce and share the expertise of these individuals. Our goal is provide the latest information on robotic dairy farm management and know how to use that knowledge in practice.

“Sharing inBen Smink_Headshotformation with colleagues means learning from one another’s experiences and that is a very important part of the Lely FMS NA team. In the end it helps us to better serve users of a robotic milking system,” says Ben Smink, Lely FMS Senior Consultant.

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New Robots and Lely Vector Up and Running in Alberta

CongratulationLelyAlberta1May2015LelyVectorMays to the Doornenbal family of Ponoka, Alberta Canada on their new dairy that features three Lely robots as well as a Lely Vector Automatic feeding system. They had previously experienced a horrible fire. We thank Penner Farm Services for sharing these great photos.

The Lely Vector automatic feeding system allows for 24/7 flexible fresh feeding of cows that is delivered accurately, precisely and with minimum labor requirements. The Lely Vector automatic feeding system is a concept that was developed in close co-operation with our customers and allows for optimal results while maintaining maximum respect for your cows.

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LelyVector1May2015

 

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#WordlessWednesday – Lely Juno 150 feed pusher

The Lely Juno 150 feed pusher never takes a break during planting season. JunoSpringPlantingApril29WW

(photo courtesy of Dundas Agri Systems, Eastern Ontario’s leader in Milking Equipment Solutions)

 

 

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